June 16, 2017: 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrates its Centennial

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrated its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrated its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrated its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrated its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrated its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrated its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrated its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrated its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrates its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrates its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrates its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrates its 100th anniversary June 16, 2017 as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

Lt. Col. Dan Newton, 22d Intelligence Squadron commander, speaks during the 22d IS Centennial event, June 16, 2017, at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. The 22d IS celebrated its 100th anniversary as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

Lt. Col. Dan Newton, 22d Intelligence Squadron commander, speaks during the 22d IS Centennial event, June 16, 2017, at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. The 22d IS celebrated its 100th anniversary as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

FORT GEORGE G. MEADE, Md. --

The 22d Intelligence Squadron celebrated its 100th anniversary June 16, as the oldest squadron under the 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing and one of the oldest military units on Fort George G. Meade, Md.  

Servicemembers from all branches, family members and civilians from the squadron commemorated the centennial with a military dining-out.

“The rich history of the 22d is something we felt compelled to honor exactly 100 years from the day it stood up at Kelly Field, Texas,” said Lt. Col. Dan Newton, 22d IS commander. “We began as a Pursuit (fighter) Squadron in WWI, flying SPAD XIII bi-planes against the German Fokker (aircraft).”

Since its beginning, back on June 16, 1917, the 22d IS has gone through many changes.

The 22d IS has participated in an assortment of missions over the years, to include training Army units, flying day-bombing missions, pursuit work, engaging Fokkers in aerial combat, using cyberspace capabilities in conjunction with the National Security Agency, and providing SIGINT capabilities to the warfighter and U.S. leaders.

 

TIMELINE

1917 – The 22d Aero Squadron stood up at Camp Kelly, Texas on June 16

1918 – Reconstituted as a Pursuit Squadron and participated in Allied air operations until the end of World War One. Received campaign streamers for Somme Defensive; Picardy; Lorraine; St. Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne (inactivated in June 1919)

1923 – Re-designated as the 22d Observation Squadron

1940 – 22d was moved under Third Army and conducted training for Army units

1943 – Designated as a Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron flying P-51/F-6 photo-reconnaissance aircraft

1945 – Participated in Allied air operations in Europe. Received campaign streamers for Central Europe; Air Combat, EAME Theater (inactivated in August 1946)

1965 – Activated and sent to France to fly the RF-4 and B-57E aircraft in support of USAFE and NATO operations

1966 – Returned to CONUS, based at Mountain (Mountain Home) AFB, Idaho and Shaw AFB, SC (inactivated in 1971)

1976 – Reactivated as the 22d Tactical Drone Squadron at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona (inactivated in April 1979)

1993 – Activated and moved to Fort Meade under the 694th Intelligence Group, 67th Intelligence Wing

2005 – Joined 70th Operations Group which became the 70 Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Group (ISRG) on Jan. 1, 2009

2009 – Resubordinated to the 707th ISRG

2016 – Joined the 691st ISRG upon its reactivation in May 2016

 

“In addition to its World War I history with the 22d Aero Squadron, the 22d IS also has a lineage to the 135th Aero Squadron,” said Andrew Anthony, 70th ISRW historian. “The 135th stood up at Rockwell Field, California on Oct. 1, 1917, and served as an observation squadron during World War I. It was the first squadron to use American-built De Havilland DH-4 reconnaissance aircraft. Because the American version of the DH-4 had a Liberty V-12 engine, the 135th was nicknamed the ‘Liberty Squadron’ and its squadron emblem featured the Statue of Liberty. During World War I, the 22d Aero Squadron and 135th Aero Squadron were not affiliated, however, in 1937 the Army Air Corps consolidated the two histories into a single unit history, which now belongs to the 22d IS.”

“As I reviewed our unit’s history, the theme that struck me was ‘INNOVATIVE AIRMEN’,” said Newton. “This theme is evident daily as our innovative Airmen make significant contributions to over 20 operational mission areas where we team with Joint partners throughout the National Security Agency. Throughout our history, the 22d has continually adapted and stayed relevant in the evolving operational environment.”

At the commemoration, the squadron’s Airmen paid respect to the fallen heroes from their history, but also used the event as an opportunity to strengthen the squadron’s identity and grow as a team.

“It was important for many of our Airmen to experience their first traditional Air Force Dining Out,” Newton said. “To make it even more special, and appropriate for a former Aero Squadron, we held the event in a hangar at the Tipton Airfield, complete with several helicopters and a former Air Force fixed-wing trainer, which provided great ambiance.”

An additional piece of 22d IS history is located at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C., according to Anthony. A Spad XIII fighter that was flown by the 22d Aero Squadron during World War I is on display there.

"After the war, the U.S. Air Service brought two Spad XIIIs, one of which belonged to the 22d Aero Squadron, back to the United States,” said Anthony. “The Smithsonian acquired the aircraft in 1919 and, aside from being refurbished in 1984-1986, it has been on display ever since. The aircraft is painted in the color scheme of a 22d Aero Squadron Spad XIII, circa 1918, and it features the squadron’s ‘Shooting Star’ emblem on its fuselage.”

Currently, the 22d IS executes global cryptologic operations to provide full-spectrum decision advantage through national and tactical integration. The squadron spans many unique mission sets across several geographically separated locations and executes National-Tactical Integration and analytical operations, leveraging full-scale cryptologic and other capabilities from the Department of Defense, Intelligence Community and NSA enterprise on behalf of the Air Component, combined/joint force air component commander (C/JFACCs) and air operations centers (AOCs) worldwide. Additionally, the 22d IS provides trained and deployable, mission-capable analysts and technicians to serve as mission partners in a broad range of NSA mission areas.