Are you the best you can be?

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once said: "Life's most persistent and urgent question is: 'What are you doing for others?'" (U.S. Air Force graphic by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton/Released)

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once said: "Life's most persistent and urgent question is: 'What are you doing for others?'" (U.S. Air Force graphic by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton)

FORT GEORGE G. MEADE, Md. -- Resiliency in the Air Force is based on being spiritually, mentally, physically, and socially fit.

"Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality," reflects the poignant quote by Doctor Martin Luther King, Jr., on the importance of being resilient.

Although you may be thinking, 'this is something I already know,' I challenge you to think about this during your day-to-day activities.

When you come to work each day, you have power, and you may not even realize the power you have.  If you are in a good or bad mood you can pass this mood on and this is based on how mentally resilient you are.

How mentally resilient you are affects all those you work with.

If you are not happy, look to how you can be happier and improve your mental resiliency. Then look to those around you, can you help them?

Physical fitness is another aspect of being resilient.  If you know someone who is struggling with their physical well-being, help them. After all, if someone is not as physically fit as they could be, they have the potential to adversely affect you.  Do all you can to make the Air Force the best it can be.

Many times spiritual fitness is synonymous with religious ideology, but that is not always the case.  Any guiding force in your life that gives you focus helps you to be spiritually fit.  And ensuring you are spiritually fit helps you be a strong person and leads to an inner peace and balance.

You can also consider how you affect the bigger picture and those in your work center.  How can you positively influence the spiritual fitness of those around you?

Humans are social creatures by nature.  Yet there are coworkers among us who avoid social interaction. They are always eating by themselves or never smile -- do we stop to ask why?  Are we doing everything we can to help them?

Martin Luther King Day is Jan. 19 and the theme is "Remember! Celebrate! Act! A Day On, Not a Day Off." One way we could honor the occasion is to work on our resiliency and help those around us with theirs.  We do have an effect on each other and we should make it a positive one by being the best person we can be and helping others.